People don’t “just happen to stop” in Glendive. Visitors to this community feel a calling. Maybe sportsmen’s activities draw them here. Maybe they’ve come for history, science, or culture. Maybe it’s a combination of all that Glendive has to offer. But ask anyone without a 16-plate on their vehicle and you’re likely to find… they’ve come to town for one of five reasons:

The Reelist

Located right on the Yellowstone River and only three miles from Hollecker Lake, Glendive is a fisherman’s getaway. Bass, perch, trout, walleye, catfish, sturgeon—there’s a species for everyone in eastern Montana!

Most notably, Glendive is known as the “Caviar Capital of Montana.” Thousands of anglers make the trek each year for a chance at snagging a paddlefish, a prehistoric species with an average weight of 55 pounds. (The state record paddlefish was 142.5 pounds and more than six feet long!) The female of the species produces valuable roe (eggs) which some people will pay $25 per ounce to eat. Roe or no, any paddlefish makes for an impressive photo op!

The Straight Shooter

Whether you enjoy your Second Amendment rights or REALLY enjoy your Second Amendment rights, Eastern Montana’s badlands are good lands to put your skills to the test. The Glendive area abounds with opportunities for hunting big game, birds, and predators. With rifle or bow, this is where hunters love to go!

Year-round, marksmen can test their skills at the community shooting range (which is open to the public).

A patriotic community, Glendive also supports the Eastern Montana Veterans Home, an 80-bed long term care facility, which serves the men and women who have served our country. If you own a gun, it’s because these heroes protect your freedoms!

The Truss Funder

Completed in 1926, the Bell Street Bridge has served Glendive for nearly a century. It was once the main highway bridge over the Yellowstone River but stopped serving motorists in 1992.

Today, people travel the 1,352-foot truss bridge by foot or by bike, enjoying the local wildlife and scenery. So adored is the Bell Street Bridge that it has been honored with a local holiday. Fans gather to show their support at Bridge Day, an event with activities, vendors, and a quarter-mile of beautiful views.

The Trailblazer

Fourteen Museums. Twelve Communities. More than 165 Million Years in the Making.

Glendive is home to two stops on the Montana Dinosaur Trail—the Frontier Gateway Museum and the Makoshika State Park Visitors Center. The community sits atop the late-Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation and has seen significant paleontological discoveries over the years, including a complete Triceratops horridus skull and a nearly complete skeleton of the rare Thescelosaur.

Of course, Glendive’s devotion to dinosaurs runs deeper than its MDT museums. Dinos appear on community signs and artworks. “The Dinos” are the local elementary school mascot. Even theology and dinosaurs intermingle here; the Glendive Dinosaur and Fossil Museum presents its impressive exhibits in a biblical context.

God bless Glendive! Nobody digs dinos quite like you.

The Dead Head

Here they are folks! The Kings of Carrion, the Carcass Connoisseurs, the Grateful for the Dead—ladies and gentlemen, give it up for The Buzzards!

Located just a couple miles south of Glendive, Makoshika State Park provides 8,832 acres for turkey vultures to nest. Though ugly as sin, they lend themselves well to the atmosphere of the badlands, and watching them has become one of the park’s main attractions. Turkey vultures fly south for the winter, so see them while you can! If you miss out, they’ll be back again next year, returning to their roosts in the spring. In honor of this pilgrimage, the Glendive community holds a yearly celebration called Buzzard Day, with a fun run, disc golf tournament, and several vulture-themed activities.

The 31st Annual Buzzard Day was unfortunately cancelled due to COVID-19, but people are still encouraged to get out, enjoy Makoshika, and view the park’s beloved buzzards. Just remember to keep six feet—or one turkey vulture’s wingspan—apart.